Amman Citadel, Amman, Jordan

“The Hill of the Citadel (Jabal al-Qal’a) in the middle of Amman was occupied as early as the Neolithic period, and fortified during the Bronze Age (1800 BC). The ruins on the hill today are Roman through early Islamic. The name “Amman” comes from “Rabbath Ammon,” or “Great City of the Ammonites,” who settled in the region some time after 1200 BC. The Bible records that King David captured the city in the early 10th century BC; Uriah the Hittite, husband of King David’s paramour Bathsheba, was killed here after the king ordered him to the front line of battle. ”

http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/jordan/amman/citadel.html

 

 

 

Fasil Ghebbi, Gondar, Ethiopia

“In the 16th and 17th centuries, the fortress-city of Fasil Ghebbi was the residence of the Ethiopian emperor Fasilides and his successors. Surrounded by a 900-m-long wall, the city contains palaces, churches, monasteries and unique public and private buildings marked by Hindu and Arab influences, subsequently transformed by the Baroque style brought to Gondar by the Jesuit missionaries.”

http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/19

 

Shah-e-Cheragh, Shiraz, Iran

“The most important pilgrimage centre of the city of Shiraz is the Mausoleum of Mir Sayyed Ahmad, the son of the seventh Emam known as Shah-e-Cheragh (the Shrine of the lord of the light), which is situated near the Masjed-e-No. Mir Sayyed Ahmad came to Ahiraz at the beginning of the third Islamic century, and died there.

After the shrines of Imam Reza in Mashhad and Fatima in Qum, the third most venerated pilgrimage destination in Iran is the shrine of Shah Cherag in the city of Shiraz.”

http://www.iranreview.org/content/Documents/Shah_e_Cheragh_Mausoleum.htm

 

 

 

Persepolis, Shiraz, Iran

“The magnificent palace complex at Persepolis was founded by Darius the Great around 518 B.C., although more than a century passed before it was finally completed. Conceived to be the seat of government for the Achaemenian kings and a center for receptions and ceremonial festivities, the wealth of the Persian empire was evident in all aspects of its construction.”

http://www.iranchamber.com/history/persepolis/persepolis1.php

 

 

 

Naqsh-e Rustam, Shiraz, Iran

Naqsh-e Rustam (Persian: Naqŝ e Rostam‎‎ [næɣʃeɾosˈtæm], “Rustam Relief”) is an ancient necropolis located about 12 km northwest of Persepolis, in Fars Province, Iran, with a group of ancient Iranian rock reliefs cut into the cliff, from both the Achaemenid and Sassanid periods. It lies a few hundred meters from Naqsh-e Rajab, with a further group of Sassanid reliefs.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naqsh-e_Rustam