Vank Catherdral, Isfahan, Iran

Holy Savior Cathedral (Armenian: Սուրբ Ամենափրկիչ Վանք, Surp Amenaprgich Vank; Persian: کلیسای وانک or آمنا پرکیج, Kelisa-ye Vank or Amenapergich‎‎; ), also known as Vank Cathedral and The Church of the Saintly Sisters, is a cathedral in Isfahan, Iran. Vank means “monastery” or “convent” in the Armenian language.

Construction is believed to have begun in 1606 by the first arrivals,[2] and completed with major alterations to design between 1655 and 1664 under the supervision of Archbishop David. The cathedral consists of a domed sanctuary, much like a Persian mosque, but with the significant addition of a semi-octagonal apse and raised chancel usually seen in western churches. The cathedral’s exteriors are in relatively modern brickwork and are exceptionally plain compared to its elaborately decorated interior.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vank_Cathedral

Wonder of Iran : http://www.payvand.com/news/10/aug/1217.html

 

Siosepol Bridge (The Bridge of 33 Arches), Isfahan, Iran

“Bridge has a large plane at the beginning of the bridge where Zayandeh River flows faster. There it has more arches making with that a suitable place for a tea house that can be accessed from the southern bank. There are two levels of arches. Lower level has 33 arches while upper has two arches above lower lever arch and one arch above pier. Road that goes on the upper level is bounded by two high walls that protect travelers from winds and pedestrians that can walk there, from falling.

Si-o-se Pol Bridge is considered largest Iranian construction on water.”

http://www.bridgesdb.com/bridge-list/siosepol-bridge/

 

Imam (Shah) Mosque, Isfahan, Iran

“Built during the Safavid period, it is an excellent example of Islamic architecture of Iran, and regarded as one of the masterpieces of Persian Architecture. The Shah Mosque of Esfahan is one of the everlasting masterpieces of architecture in Iran. It is registered, along with the Naghsh-i Jahan Square, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Its construction began in 1611, and its splendor is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions. The mosque is one of the treasures featured on Around the World in 80 Treasures presented by the architecture historian Dan Cruickshank.”

Imam (Shah) Mosque in Isfahan, Iran

 

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque, Isfahan, Iran

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque (Persian: مسجد شیخ لطف الله‎‎)[2] is one of the architectural masterpieces of Safavid Iranian architecture, standing on the eastern side of Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan, Iran.

The purpose of this mosque was for it to be a private mosque of the royal court … For this reason, the mosque does not have any minarets and is of a smaller size.

When reaching the entrance of the mosque, one would have to walk through a passage that winds round and round, until one finally reaches the main building. Along this passage there were standing guards, and the obvious purpose of this design was for the women of the harem to be shielded as much as possible from anyone entering the building.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheikh_Lotfollah_Mosque

 

Ali Qapu Palace, Isfahan, Iran

“The Ali Qapu palace is well-known palace all over Iran. The first part of palace was built in 1597. It was used as a residential palace. Shah Abbas the great, ordered to construct the palace on the site of palace and garden from the Timurid time. Shah Abbas’s palace was a four floors with a veranda. Shah Abbas the second, expanded the palace and a music hall (room) was constructed on the top of palace.”

http://isfahan.ir/ShowPage.aspx?page_=form&order=show&lang=3&sub=70&PageId=4578&codeV=1&tempname=iadim

The music hall :

 

Ash reshteh @ Abbasi Hotel, Isfahan, Iran

Ash reshteh also known as Ash-e reshteh (Persian: آش رشته‎‎) is a type of āsh (thick soup) featuring reshteh (thin noodles), kashk (a whey-like, fermented dairy product), commonly made in Iran and Azerbaijan.

Traditional Ash reshteh is served at special Iranian events, like Nowruz, Sizdah be-dar or during winter time.[1][3] The noodles are suppose to symbolize good fortune for the new year.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ash_reshteh