Nasir al-Mulk Mosque, Shiraz, Iran

“The mosque is called by many different names. Mostly known as the “Pink Mosque” … This is a space where light and worship intertwine. The mosque comes to life with the sunrise and colours dance throughout the day like whirling dervishes. It reflects on the ground, walls, the arches and the towering spires … ”

http://muslimheritage.com/article/mosque-whirling-colours-mixture-architecture-and-art-nas%C4%ABr-al-mulk-mosque-shiraz-iran

 

 

 

 

Shah-e-Cheragh, Shiraz, Iran

“The most important pilgrimage centre of the city of Shiraz is the Mausoleum of Mir Sayyed Ahmad, the son of the seventh Emam known as Shah-e-Cheragh (the Shrine of the lord of the light), which is situated near the Masjed-e-No. Mir Sayyed Ahmad came to Ahiraz at the beginning of the third Islamic century, and died there.

After the shrines of Imam Reza in Mashhad and Fatima in Qum, the third most venerated pilgrimage destination in Iran is the shrine of Shah Cherag in the city of Shiraz.”

http://www.iranreview.org/content/Documents/Shah_e_Cheragh_Mausoleum.htm

 

 

 

Persepolis, Shiraz, Iran

“The magnificent palace complex at Persepolis was founded by Darius the Great around 518 B.C., although more than a century passed before it was finally completed. Conceived to be the seat of government for the Achaemenian kings and a center for receptions and ceremonial festivities, the wealth of the Persian empire was evident in all aspects of its construction.”

http://www.iranchamber.com/history/persepolis/persepolis1.php

 

 

 

Naqsh-e Rustam, Shiraz, Iran

Naqsh-e Rustam (Persian: Naqŝ e Rostam‎‎ [næɣʃeɾosˈtæm], “Rustam Relief”) is an ancient necropolis located about 12 km northwest of Persepolis, in Fars Province, Iran, with a group of ancient Iranian rock reliefs cut into the cliff, from both the Achaemenid and Sassanid periods. It lies a few hundred meters from Naqsh-e Rajab, with a further group of Sassanid reliefs.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naqsh-e_Rustam